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Joint airborne air transportatability taining (JAAT)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Maries, and Air Force perform a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. . (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Maries, and Air Force perform a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. . (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Patrick Lacicero, co-pilot of the C-130 H2 aircraft from the 181st Airlift Squadron, Texas Air National Guard prepares his oxygen mask for the high altitude air drop at 25,000 feet above ground level at McDill Air Force Base, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The mission is a joint airborne air transportability training (JAAT) with the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force paratroopers. (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Patrick Lacicero, co-pilot of the C-130 H2 aircraft from the 181st Airlift Squadron, Texas Air National Guard prepares his oxygen mask for the high altitude air drop at 25,000 feet above ground level at McDill Air Force Base, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The mission is a joint airborne air transportability training (JAAT) with the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force paratroopers. (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force prepare to do a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force prepare to do a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Maries, and Air Force do a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. . (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

Paratroopers from the U.S. Army, Navy, Maries, and Air Force do a static line jump from a C-130H2 aircraft belonging to the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard during a joint airborne air transportability training at McDill AFB, Fla., Nov. 15, 2013. The paratroopers jumped from 1,000 feet above ground level. . (Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Elizabeth Gilbert/released)

MCDILL AFB, fla. -- U.S. paratroopers from all branches of the service participated in a joint airborne air
transportability training or known as JAATT, to meet their mission requirements and qualifications for jumping out of an aircraft here, Nov. 15, 2013.

The C-130H2 Hercules aircraft from the 136th Airlift Wing, Texas Air National Guard provided the airlift for the static line jump and the high-altitude/lowopening (HALO) free-fall jump.

"JAATT is more and more the mission type the 136 AW is requested to do," said Major Marcus Gonser, 136th Operations Group, current operations officer.

With sequestration and a tight budget, joint training is being utilized to its maximum potential. The 136 AW proved that they have what it takes to deliver paratroopers to their designated
zone. All sorties scheduled took off on time and on target; the only limiting factor was the weather.